Exploring (page 1 of 3)

An Expat in Wales: Life in Swansea

Growing up on a farm on a dirt road in Mississippi I dreamed of travel, of one day living someplace far away and glamourous. Like Swansea. Okay, maybe not glamourous in the sexy sense of the word but in the sense that it is unfamiliar and offers endless opportunities for discovery. This is in itself a kind of enchantment.

For me, a trip to Swansea Market is a strange delight. Fishmongers! Of course you can get fresh fish in America but until I moved here I had never seen  honest-to-gosh stalls devoted to nothing but fresh, shiny seafood. Pig’s trotters! You know what you just do not see in America? Severed pig’s feet piled in a cardboard box and skinned porcine carcasses on a pallet. Gruesome, yes, but fascinating and a deeply important reminder that our food comes from a living source, not some sterile styrofoam factory. Oops, my proofreader (otherwise known as my husband) says that we say “polystyrene” here.

Well, there you go. Hubby is a nice boy from Manchester. We’ve been together for ten years and after all this time we still find differences in our so-called common language. For instance, did you know that in [read more]

La Maison du Pastel

Recently I visited La Maison du Pastel. I was toting handmade paper and ink and a journal or two that I had bought on the other side of the Marais and had trudged miles to find it tucked away on the rue Rambuteau and I guess it all showed because as I walked in, the lady behind the counter looked at me and said quietly, “Le Graal.” She wasn’t wrong. I don’t even work in pastels and this room was the holy grail.

These pastels have been made since 1722 and has been in the Marais district of France since 1766. In 1878, M. Henri Roché took over the concern and it is in his family still. Currently they have 1540 tints and counting of pastels that are world famous for their intense colour and quality. (They were the pastel of choice for Degas.)

I bought a small box of half sticks. They were (understandably) expensive and as I say, pastel is not my medium of choice but how could I walk away without something, some touchstone and connection to hundreds of years of artisans committed to creating the finest tools for creating. A spell. A part of the grail.

To visit La [read more]

Illustrated Journal Pages, France (Burgundy)

These are some recent illustrated journal pages from last Fall’s trip through Burgundy in France. Santé ! (Click on photo for larger image.)

And below is a flipthrough with commentary about how I made some of the [read more]

Illustrated Journal Pages: Churches

Here are recent pages, including churches and notes from Llandaff Cathedral in Cardiff, as well as French churches in Perpignan, the Priory at Serrabone, Elne Cathedral.

To see more sketchbook journal pages of churches, go to:

http://bookandpaperarts.com/bookandpaper/illustrated-journals/illustrated-journals-drawing-in-churches/

For more information on some of these lovely Romanesque churches, try:

http://www.francethisway.com/places/elne.php

https://www.france-voyage.com/travel-photos/serrabone-priory-167.htm

[read more]

Illustrated Journal: France, Burgundy, and Churches

These sketches are from my illustrated journal is a recent trip to the Burgundy region of France. There are many hundreds of Romanesque churches, built between the 10th and 12th centuries. Before then, the area had been occupied and ruled over by Romans. Then they were gone but their architecture and design influence remained and were powerful influences in the creation of these churches. It was a time of crusades and pilgrimages, both of which brought travelers into tiny villages needing accommodation, food, and other practical provisions: these churches attracted these pilgrims and profited from their donations, as did the towns around them.

Hilaire Belloc, writing about his pilgrimage from France to Rome wrote of such places that: “In such shrines Mass is to be said but rarely, sometimes but once a year in a special commemoration. The rest of the time they stand empty, and some of the older or simpler, one might take for ruins. They mark everywhere some strong emotion of supplication, thanks, or reverence, and they anchor these wild places to their own past, making up in memories what they lack in multitudinous life.”

Click on an image to see a larger [read more]

Illustrated Journal Pages – Asheville

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Illustrated Journal Pages – Skomer

Skomer is an island off the coast of Wales which serves as a wildlife refuge with millions of pairs of breeding birds. An overnight stay is often cold, wet, and indescribably satisfying.

To read more posts about my visits to Skomer, go to:

http://alteredbookarts.com/food-travel/here-there-be-puffins-skomer-island/

http://alteredbookarts.com/food-travel/memento-mori-the-shearwater-ghosts-of-skomer/

[read more]

Travel Journal Pages

These are illustrated journal pages from the last quarter of 2015. From Zurich and Madrid. I sit in churches a lot. Also, cafes.

https://www.zuerich.com/en/visit/restaurants/gran-cafe-motta

 

http://www.grossmuenster.ch/de/

 

http://www.kunsthaus.ch/en/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toledo,_Spain

 

http://www.madridtourist.info/rastro_market.html

 

http://www.travelsignposts.com/Spain/sightseeing/puente-de-san-martin-toledo-legend

 

[read more]

St Paul’s Graveyard: Lovely Headstones in Sketty, Wales

I have walked past this church so many times but until recently never noticed how lovely some of its old headstones are in its surrounding cemetery. I have now, and here are a few of them.

[read more]

Memento Mori: The Shearwater Ghosts of Skomer

On the island of Skomer, off the coast of Wales, is the largest population of Manx Shearwaters in the world. Under cover of the middle of the night, they fly in from the sea where they have been feeding. Hundreds of thousands of birds go hell for leather into the safety of their underground burrows. In the morning, the paths of Skomer are littered with the occasional bodies, or what is left of them, of the unlucky ones who didn’t make it but instead fell prey to the Greater Black Back Gulls who feed on them. All that is left is a pair of wings on a path and they fascinate me. They are the most striking memento mori – reminders that we must die – that I have ever seen (and I’m a gal who likes a good memento mori). So a typical morning on Skomer is: get up, have some coffee, hike, hike, hike, and oh, hey, remember that we must die: thanks guys, got it. And strangely, these visceral tokens of life and how quickly and randomly it is snuffed out are so lovely and unlikely.

From my post on Skomer:

The next morning, paths around the island are [read more]

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